What is the lighting regulation for sports facilities?

The  recent update of the UNE-EN 12193:2020 standard  for lighting sports facilities introduces  additional technical requirements  in reform projects as well as in those of new execution. The changes are relevant and must be taken into account when sizing facilities correctly , not only in basic aspects of illuminance and uniformity but also in other increasingly important aspects such as glare, pollution and light intrusion. Let’s find out what they are.

Standards for lighting design

With regard to lighting design, the main national and regional standards, such as the NIDE, are directly supported by UNE-EN 12193, which is the  reference standard , complementing it, for example, in other aspects of a constructive nature (eg heights support minimums).

The UNE-EN 12193 establishes the lighting criteria for indoor and outdoor sports spaces for the most practiced sports types in Europe. Provides lighting values ​​in terms of illuminance, uniformity, glare, color properties of light sources, etc.  Sports that do not appear in said standard, such as Basque pelota or Valencian pelota, have their own specific lighting design regulations.

The update of the European Standard EN 12193:2018  replaces the previous one from 2009  and involves substantial changes that are summarized below .

Spectator area lighting

It is increased to 20 lux for stepped or inclined areas . Given that many stands and seats are located in this type of staggered area, the change  means doubling the average level of light compared to what was previously required , which was 10 lux .

Top priority for glare limitation

The glare of players, judges and spectators must be controlled to avoid discomfort or even a reduction in their visual performance.  The new norm emphasizes that “this requirement has the highest priority”.

  • In  outdoor spaces, the use of the R Gindex (previously called GR) is maintained  to assess the maximum glare allowed. In general, a maximum R G  of 50 is adopted for lighting classes type I (national competition) and II (regional competition), and 55 for classes III (training, local or recreational competition).
  • In  interior spaces, in addition to the R UG index (now called UGR), the use of the RG index is enabled for  viewing positions below the horizontal. In general, a maximum RG of 35 is adopted for  classes I and 40 for classes II and III.
  • The  glare measurement heightis fixed at 1.5 m.

Regulatory compliance with maximum glare  requires providing the correct height to the projectors and, in many cases, replacing the current supports. For example, a class III soccer field that intends to raise its level to class II will very possibly have to modify the existing supports both in height and in capacity to accommodate a greater number of luminaires.

On the other hand, the  use of projectors with asymmetrical optics , each time with greater presence in the market, will facilitate the control of glare, light pollution and the limitation of disturbing light.

Interference light limitation

Limits of disturbing light from sports facilities are established  , depending on the environmental zoning in which they are located, on nearby buildings or roads. In particular they are limited:

  • The average illuminance on windows of nearby buildings
  • The intensity of the luminaires in potential directions of generating discomfort
  • The flux emitted to the upper hemisphere (known as FHS MAXor RUL MAX ) of the facility
  • The maximum luminances of the facades of nearby buildings (L b)
  • The maximum contrast threshold increment value (TI of π) on nearby road traffic

In general, and especially in environmentally sensitive areas (such as E1 or E2), it is recommended to preferably adopt  asymmetrical beam projectors that improve light distribution and considerably reduce the FHS, assigning narrow-beam symmetrical ones for long projection distances where asymmetrical ones leave to be effective . Alternatively, it is possible to introduce beam control accessories such as visors or louvres to reduce glare.

Illuminances and uniformities

The criteria of horizontal illuminance , vertical illuminance  and uniformity in the main game areas (PA)  are maintained . As in the glare measurement, the vertical illuminance measurement is fixed at 1.5m in height.

Additionally, it is established that the  average uniformity (U2)  in the total area (TA) will be at least 75% of that of the main area (PA); and that the  extreme uniformity (U1)  will be at least 50% of the average uniformity (U2) in the main area (PA). Both requirements, which were not mandatory before, will undoubtedly result in a better light distribution  both in the main playing area and in the surrounding area (for example, the corner of a football field), avoiding the presence of areas with flashes .

color temperature

The standard does not establish specific values ​​of color temperatures except for outdoor televised installations , where it is indicated that it should be between  5000 and 6000K , avoiding the mixture of lights (including natural light) with different color tones. 

The  rest of the facilities  usually adopt color temperatures between  4000 and 5000K , although other possible regional regulations (eg  Decree 190/2015 Catalonia ) or more restrictive public aid bases (eg DUS 5000 ) must be taken into account. account.

Color rendering index

The chromatic reproduction capacity of a light source is important in sports facilities to be able to correctly distinguish the colors of such basic elements as the delimiting lines of a playing field or the shirt of the rivals.

The new norm increases the minimum IRC index from 20 to 60 and in some sports for class I it is increased from 70 to 80.  Conventional lamps, such as high or low pressure sodium, are definitively out of application.

LED technology  has an IRC greater than 70 in general, which can be valid for many types of sports and competition classes , but it must be taken into account that this is not always the case and there are cases with higher requirements. Additionally, televised installations may require compliance with other, more demanding color consistency indices, such as the TLCI.

CELER can advise you on the design of a sports lighting project, adapting it to the new regulations. Its technical team provides all the necessary advice in the process prior to installation and assistance in execution and start-up, so that the professional has all the necessary tools to carry out a perfect job.

Standards for lighting design

With regard to lighting design, the main national and regional standards, such as the NIDE, are directly supported by UNE-EN 12193, which is the  reference standard , complementing it, for example, in other aspects of a constructive nature (eg heights support minimums).

The UNE-EN 12193 establishes the lighting criteria for indoor and outdoor sports spaces for the most practiced sports types in Europe. Provides lighting values ​​in terms of illuminance, uniformity, glare, color properties of light sources, etc.  Sports that do not appear in said standard, such as Basque pelota or Valencian pelota, have their own specific lighting design regulations.

The update of the European Standard EN 12193:2018  replaces the previous one from 2009  and involves substantial changes that are summarized below .

Spectator area lighting

It is increased to 20 lux for stepped or inclined areas . Given that many stands and seats are located in this type of staggered area, the change  means doubling the average level of light compared to what was previously required , which was 10 lux .

Top priority for glare limitation

The glare of players, judges and spectators must be controlled to avoid discomfort or even a reduction in their visual performance.  The new norm emphasizes that “this requirement has the highest priority”.

  • In  outdoor spaces, the use of the R Gindex (previously called GR) is maintained  to assess the maximum glare allowed. In general, a maximum R G  of 50 is adopted for lighting classes type I (national competition) and II (regional competition), and 55 for classes III (training, local or recreational competition).
  • In  interior spaces, in addition to the R UG index (now called UGR), the use of the RG index is enabled for  viewing positions below the horizontal. In general, a maximum RG of 35 is adopted for  classes I and 40 for classes II and III.
  • The  glare measurement heightis fixed at 1.5 m.

Regulatory compliance with maximum glare  requires providing the correct height to the projectors and, in many cases, replacing the current supports. For example, a class III soccer field that intends to raise its level to class II will very possibly have to modify the existing supports both in height and in capacity to accommodate a greater number of luminaires.

On the other hand, the  use of projectors with asymmetrical optics , each time with greater presence in the market, will facilitate the control of glare, light pollution and the limitation of disturbing light.

Interference light limitation

Limits of disturbing light from sports facilities are established  , depending on the environmental zoning in which they are located, on nearby buildings or roads. In particular they are limited:

  • The average illuminance on windows of nearby buildings
  • The intensity of the luminaires in potential directions of generating discomfort
  • The flux emitted to the upper hemisphere (known as FHS MAXor RUL MAX ) of the facility
  • The maximum luminances of the facades of nearby buildings (L b)
  • The maximum contrast threshold increment value (TI of π) on nearby road traffic

In general, and especially in environmentally sensitive areas (such as E1 or E2), it is recommended to preferably adopt  asymmetrical beam projectors that improve light distribution and considerably reduce the FHS, assigning narrow-beam symmetrical ones for long projection distances where asymmetrical ones leave to be effective . Alternatively, it is possible to introduce beam control accessories such as visors or louvres to reduce glare.

Illuminances and uniformities

The criteria of horizontal illuminance , vertical illuminance  and uniformity in the main game areas (PA)  are maintained . As in the glare measurement, the vertical illuminance measurement is fixed at 1.5m in height.

Additionally, it is established that the  average uniformity (U2)  in the total area (TA) will be at least 75% of that of the main area (PA); and that the  extreme uniformity (U1)  will be at least 50% of the average uniformity (U2) in the main area (PA). Both requirements, which were not mandatory before, will undoubtedly result in a better light distribution  both in the main playing area and in the surrounding area (for example, the corner of a football field), avoiding the presence of areas with flashes .

color temperature

The standard does not establish specific values ​​of color temperatures except for outdoor televised installations , where it is indicated that it should be between  5000 and 6000K , avoiding the mixture of lights (including natural light) with different color tones. 

The  rest of the facilities  usually adopt color temperatures between  4000 and 5000K , although other possible regional regulations (eg  Decree 190/2015 Catalonia ) or more restrictive public aid bases (eg DUS 5000 ) must be taken into account. account.

Color rendering index

The chromatic reproduction capacity of a light source is important in sports facilities to be able to correctly distinguish the colors of such basic elements as the delimiting lines of a playing field or the shirt of the rivals.

The new norm increases the minimum IRC index from 20 to 60 and in some sports for class I it is increased from 70 to 80.  Conventional lamps, such as high or low pressure sodium, are definitively out of application.

LED technology  has an IRC greater than 70 in general, which can be valid for many types of sports and competition classes , but it must be taken into account that this is not always the case and there are cases with higher requirements. Additionally, televised installations may require compliance with other, more demanding color consistency indices, such as the TLCI.

CELER can advise you on the design of a sports lighting project, adapting it to the new regulations. Its technical team provides all the necessary advice in the process prior to installation and assistance in execution and start-up, so that the professional has all the necessary tools to carry out a perfect job.

For more information, please contact us.

Website:www.aikoled.com

Email: info@aikoled.com

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